Tangara Trail

Design Feature
Type of Project
Local Government Initiative
State
Tasmania
Location
Regional

The Tangara Trail is an 80 kilometre network of tracks in the Clarence City Council local government area, stretching from Five Mile Beach, near Hobart Airport, to South Arm. It is a multi-use recreational trail which is frequented by equestrian riders, walkers, and mountain bike riders who live locally, as well as attracting visitors from further afield.  

‘Tangara’ is an Aboriginal word for ‘Let’s get away together’. The trail takes in varied landscapes, weaving between property boundaries, roads, beaches and bushland. The trail continues to grow and evolve with sections added each year.  

Preserving natural bushland

The trail is managed and maintained by Council. It was established during the 1970s by a dedicated group of local horse riders who wanted a trail for horse riding in the local area. Council worked with the residents to officially open the trail in 1985. In 1988, following an open meeting held by Council, the Tangara Horse Riding Trails Association and committee was formed to plan the future development of horse riding trails and liaise with land owners to realise this goal. In the decades since it was established, the committee and its role has evolved to include walking and cycling, including a name change to Tangara Recreational Trails Inc. The committee maintains a Tangara Trail website which includes maps, track descriptions and photos. 

The Tangara trail passes through scenic coastal reserves, undulating semi-rural country and small seaside villages, and caters for people walking, cycling or horse riding. 

The trail was first developed through an interest from the horse riding community. The Acton and Sandford areas comprised of five-acre subdivisions which attracted residents who owned horses and there was a push from this community to see a network of trails developed in the locality for horse riding.  '

A provision of the Tasmanian Local Government (Building and Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1993 is for developers subdividing land to provide up to 5% public open space contribution. This was used to obtain corridors of public open space to use for the Tangara Trail network. 

The bushland and bush corridors of the Tangara Trail enhance the habitat and movement of wildlife.
The bushland and bush corridors of the Tangara Trail enhance the habitat and movement of wildlife.

Clarence City Council has provided grants to revegetate degraded areas and installed attractive post and rail ‘gateways’ at the entrance points. An extensive signage program has been implemented during the past four years with various sections of the Tangara Trail appointed individual track names to help with navigating the trail. The trail is recognised in Clarence City Council’s strategic plans and Council has worked closely with the Tangara Recreational Trails Committee to produce a colourful publication that includes useful information and a map for users.  

The Tangara Trail offers a safe and easily accessible place for a wide range of people to engage with the natural environment.
The Tangara Trail offers a safe and easily accessible place for a wide range of people to engage with the natural environment.

The trails have been extended over many years with establishment costs carried as part of land subdivision. Council allocates funds each year for maintenance to ensure safe access for users. Maintenance issues are reported to Council by Tangara Recreational Trails Inc. and a regular maintenance program is in place for keeping vegetation trimmed, grass mowed, and drainage issues addressed. 

Although the trail was initially developed for horse riding, recreational users also use the trail for walking and biking. An advantage of the Tangara Trail is it has many access points and provides a permeable network of routes for walking or riding through semi-rural areas. 

Project Team 

  • Clarence City Council  
  • Tangara Recreational Trails Inc. 

Project Cost 

  • Unknown 

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